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Wednesday, November 30, 2022
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Christmas trees might be harder to find this year

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Christmas trees may be harder to find than usual.

According to npr.org, Jami Warner, the executive director of the American Christmas Tree Association, tells Morning Edition that both environmental and economic factors are to blame.

Extreme weather events like wildfires, droughts and floods have made this an especially challenging season for growers. Such events are driven by climate change and could become more common as the Earth warms.

“The great majority of our artificial Christmas trees are manufactured in China, and Christmas trees and pretty much every other consumer good is languishing either out at sea or hasn’t shipped yet,” Warner explains.

Experts expect the bottleneck at U.S. ports is to get even worse during the holiday season, exacerbated by Americans’ online shopping.

All of this means that you can expect to pay at least 20% more for your Tannenbaum, whether real or artificial.

After all, there are many other sources of Yuletide joy — especially this season, with vaccinations making it safer for people to travel and gather.

“This year, I think people will be able to celebrate Christmas with their families again and with their friends, and no one is going to notice if you don’t have that very, very perfect Christmas tree,” Warner says. “Really, there are no such thing as bad Christmas trees — they’re all beautiful.”

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